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2022 Request for Quotation
Oregon Nearshore Data Management, Portals, and Hubs Assessment

Managers often need access to data and information to inform key management decisions – but in many instances, the data do not exist, are in numerous locations with varying accessibility, or are inaccessible. Data on Oregon’s nearshore is currently sited in a variety of locations, including the West Coast Ocean Data Portal, Oregon Spatial Data Library, Oregon Coastal Atlas, ODFW’s Data Dashboard, Data Basin, TSP Part Five Data Catalog, and numerous data.gov ocean datasets, to name a few. Facilitating access to all of Oregon’s nearshore data will enable integration and avoid duplicity. In addition to enhanced access, the OOST seeks to enhance storage, dissemination, and archival capabilities for Oregon nearshore ocean data.

 

To develop a nearshore data portal, or hub, that includes all of Oregon’s publicly-available nearshore data requires an initial needs assessment. Upon completing the needs assessment, the OOST will solicit competitive grants to develop a strategy to integrate and coordinate existing systems, and develop, test, and implement a functional open-source data hub to make all nearshore datasets publicly accessible. The OOST places a strong emphasis on the use of existing systems and software to create a sustainable long-term solution for Oregon.

 

Upon completing the needs assessment, the OOST will solicit competitive grants through a Request for Proposal process to develop a strategy to integrate and coordinate existing systems, and develop, test, and implement a functional open-source data hub to make all nearshore datasets publicly accessible.

 

Phase I Needs Assessment – up to $10,000 available
 

Document/inventory existing state and regional ocean data management systems; describe how existing software can support archiving and dissemination of information, and propose how the systems can be integrated and coordinated.

 

Applicants are expected to use Best Available Science, including, but not limited to, peer-reviewed publications, mainstream science data sets and repositories, citizen- and community-based science, and Traditional Ecological Knowledge in the development of proposals and implementation of projects if awarded and as applicable. Traditional Ecological Knowledge is a cumulative body of knowledge, practice, and belief evolving by adaptive processes and handed down through generations by cultural transmission, about the relationship of living beings (including humans) with one another and with their environment. Best Available Science should incorporate accuracy, reliability, and relevancy of methodology, approaches, and interpretation of data and other information. It is expected that the proposed research concepts of “Cause No Harm” and “Free, Prior, and Informed Consent” responsibilities are adopted and adhered to when consulting with any Tribe, indigenous community, or Tribal member.

 

Deliverables:
Conduct a needs assessment by February 28, 2023 to:
 

  • Document/inventory and characterize existing state and regional ocean data management systems;

  • Describe how existing software/portals/hubs can support archiving and dissemination of information;

  • Compile and characterize existing coastal/nearshore data sets and their respective components;

  • Document needs ocean managers, planners, industry, communities, and others have for access to coastal/nearshore data sets;

  • Document existing and recommend best management practices to sustainably manage an open-source nearshore data portal; and

  • Make recommendations on how the existing state and regional ocean data management systems can be integrated and coordinated using proposed best management practices.

 

Quotes due December 1, 2022 via email @ 5pm PST to lisad@createstrat.com.